About Us

The Melbourne University Health Initiative (MUHI) is a student-run charity dedicated to public and global health. Students from a diverse range of faculties, with a common passion for elevating healthcare standards, are involved with MUHI. We are supported by the Nossal Institute for Global Health and as the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences at the University of Melbourne. Read more about our purpose here!

Our Purpose

Are you passionate about health causes, and bridging inequality?

Register your interest to attend the AusWHO Conference in March, Tutor with our Student Welfare Outreach Team (SWOT), or to get notifications for general Volunteering Opportunities (of which there are always plenty). We would love to hear from you!

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Featured Articles

These articles have been submitted by both MUHI members and generous contributors. There are a mix of opinion pieces, informative pieces, personal stories and light-hearted banter. Check back regularly to keep up to date!
Polio - The Endgame Strategy

Polio – The Endgame Strategy

The poliovirus is a mere 30 nanometres in diameter yet has wreaked havoc for thousands of years. While most patients have no symptoms, 1 in 20 experience fever, a sore throat, nausea and vomiting. A further 1 in 200 will suffer from paralysis. In the most severe cases this includes the muscles needed for breathing, with images of children in so called ‘iron lungs’ now infamous. However, scientific advances over the past 50 years mean that it is now on

Bring your life to life - Have an Affair!

Bring your life to life – Have an Affair!

In the western culture love, sex and commitment are considered interrelated in romantic relationships and sexual exclusivity is one of the fundamental rules.1 Some relationships have an open sexual attitude, where partners have sexual relationships with other individuals. However, there is a big difference between negotiating extradyadic relationships and having secretive affairs, the most prominent being the asymmetry of information between the partners. This asymmetry exposes the non-aware partner to added risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV, particularly

So who wants to talk about contraception? Teenagers look the other direction in class, teachers stumble over their words, and parents do their best to avoid the topic until their child is 18 years old. It is a difficult topic, of course, but what many parents do not realise is that by not overcoming the initial embarrassment and feelings of awkwardness, they may be putting their children at major health risk.

Youth of Australia – Ignorant or Uneducated?

So who wants to talk about contraception? Teenagers look the other direction in class, teachers stumble over their words, and parents do their best to avoid the topic until their child is 18 years old. It is a difficult topic, of course, but what many parents do not realise is that by not overcoming the initial embarrassment and feelings of awkwardness, they may be putting their children at major health risk. The misuse of contraceptives (or lack thereof) throughout a